You tell us:

If you were forced to choose, which would you go without:?
Food 23.21 %
Wine 76.79 %
( 336 Votes)
For a two-course meal, would you prefer dessert or entree?
Dessert 44.94 %
Entree 55.06 %
( 316 Votes)

- Podcasts
- News

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

 

 

   
What is food without a great wine? Here are a few of our favourites...
21st Jul 2017
   

Our top 5's:

Dave and Alicia's Best :
  1 : Tetsuya's
  2 : Attica
  3 : Vue de Monde
  4 : Bistro Guillaume
  5 : Rockpool Bar and Grill
   
Lachie & Sarah's Picks :
  1 : Attica
  2 : Jacques Reymond
  3 : The Lake House
  4 : Pearl
  5 : Matteo's
   

Quick Links:
  Restaurants
  Recipes
  Reviews

Featured Links:
  Rathdowne Cellars
  William Downie
  Moss Wood

News Archives:
  Jun 2017
  May 2017
  Apr 2017
  Mar 2017
  Feb 2017
  Jan 2017
  Show all

 

 
 
Browse All
Claymore 2005 Shiraz - Dark side of the moon

Type:

Red Wine
Claymore wines is one of the smaller producers in the Clare region, but recently their wines have been distributed into more of the mainstream retailers - definitely a good thing. This wine is fruit driven, with good structure and a solid finish. Not as big and heavy as those from the Barossa, this (and it's Cabernet Sauvignon brother, "Graceland") are great food wines, and won't break the budget, either. Highly recommended for this price bracket, I've seen it in Dan Murphy's and King and Godfrey usually have a good supply.

http://www.claymorewines.com.au/
Write-up by Dave

Variety: Shiraz
Price range: Around $20
Dominique Portet 2007 Fontaine Rose

Type:

Rose
Sarah's favourite rose. A dry yet refreshing summer wine.

http://www.dominiqueportet.com/
Write-up by Lachie

Variety: Rose
Price range: $24
Punter's Corner 2002 and 2003 Chardonnay

Type:

White wine
These Coonawarra whites are great value - have a listen to our second podcast for a bit of a rant about them during a vertical tasting. The '02 is a bit more refined, with higher acid on the finish, while the '03 brings out the malolactic fermentation for a more creamy, buttery palate. Interestingly, these were both matured in Russian oak, supposedly quite similar to French, but much cheaper. Tastes pretty good in my book!

http://www.punterscorner.com.au/
Write-up by Dave

Variety: Chardonnay
Price range: Under $30 a bottle
William Downie 2006 Mornington Pinot Noir

Type:

Red Wine
Bill Downie was named young wine maker of the year in 2007 (I think it was '07) and with good reason: he only makes Pinot, and it's good stuff. The Mornington version is a more fruit driven wine than his Yarra Valley wine, but don't dismiss it as a "watery pinot" - it's got plenty of spine to back it up. Bright berry flavours on the palate go well with gamey foods, or rich sauces - we enjoyed it with the Stuffed chicken with truffle and pomegranate that we did on the first podcast. Highly recommended, and worth watching in the future.

http://www.williamdownie.com.au/
Write-up by Dave

Variety: Pinot Noir
Price range: around $50/bottle
Tahbilk 2008 Riesling

Type:

White wine
Surprised me. I'm generally not a fan of Victorian riesling (without a recommendation I tend not to try them, I've been hurt too many times), but this one is great value and extremely drinkable.

https://www.tahbilk.com.au/wines/index.php?view=detail&id=17
Write-up by Lachie

Variety: Riesling
Price range: $12.95 cellar door

 

 

All content copyright © 2008 Gourmet Husbands. For privacy statement, please click here